More… “How To Be A Good Wedding Host”

I have written quite a few blog posts on being a good ‘Wedding Guest’, but thought it was time for another post on “How to Be a Good Wedding Host”.  It is not hard.  I don’t think I have worked with a bride yet who hasn’t been thoughtful and considerate of her guests’ comfort.  But sometimes, it’s a good idea to check-in with some on-line resources, (such as this blog!  🙂  ), and you may run across something you haven’t thought of yet.

The next five photos are mine from a lovely “Camp” wedding I was the ‘Day of Event’ Planner for.  The bride and groom thought of everything.  Above, the female guests are invited to choose a pair of flip flops in case their party shoes began to pinch when it came time for the dancing to begin.

It was a lovely warm day, but as day turned to night, it DID get a little chilly.  Not to worry!  The wedding hosts had a basket at the ready with shawls to borrow if needed.

And why would I post the photo above?  Because the bride and groom at this wedding thought of everything.  They had an elderly grandfather, (we should all be so lucky!), and wanted to insure that he had an exceptionally comfortable seat with the dark chair above.

Serving ice cold drinks in the late summer heat?  How about a cozy to keep that beverage cold, and your hands comfortable?

With an outside wedding, you just might encounter a pesky mosquito or two.  Never fear, the wedding couple had bug spray conveniently located for their guests.  I love the novelty of it hanging in the tree.

This photo was from a wedding last summer.  When guests walked into the wedding venue area, they were greeted with a cocktail to keep them cool as they waited for the lovely couple to make their appearance.

And finally… you may not always have this option, but if you anticipate a hot day for your outdoor wedding, try to choose a time of day when it will not be as hot, and place your guests’ chairs in the shade it there is any.

Feel free to send me ideas you have used for your own wedding to make your guests comfortable!

Unusual Wedding Veils

Unusual Wedding Veils… Wedding Dresses move in trends. Remember the “Mermaid” gown? In the 50’s, tea-length wedding dresses were all the rage.  But what about wedding veils? The biggest trend I see these days regarding wedding veils, is brides are choosing NOT to wear them.  I find this a little sad.  To me, the wedding veil makes a bride look like a bride.  But remember, there is no right or wrong when it comes to a bride’s attire; just what YOU like.

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But…enter onto the world stage, Meghan Markle, the newly minted Duchess of Sussex.  When I think of her wedding attire, what stands out for me is her fabulous veil.  Her wedding gown was very elegant, but was almost too plain.  But the dramatic veil she wore sky-rocketed her ensemble to the level she needed as a royal bride.

Not sure about the above veil.  I think one would have to be careful with the gold.  It would be a limiting color scheme, although it IS beautiful.

How about the veil below?  While dramatic, I think it over-powers the bride’s dress.  It’s just too much.

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The above veil would definitely require a dress that was simple in design, like Meghan’s was.  It doesn’t appear to me that was this bride’s choice.  Too much of a good thing in my opinion.

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This veil is along the same lines of Ms. Markle’s.  Bigger than life, coupled with a simple, yet elegant gown.  I like the look.

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Directly opposite to the last photo, is the gown and veil above.  Wow!  Talk about over the top. While it’s awe-inspiring, it’s just too much for my taste.

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The last photo above, is my favorite.  It combines just the right amount of umph to an classic, unadorned gown.

The Fall Wedding

The Fall Wedding… Summer is almost over.  It’s time to look ahead to the Fall Wedding.

There are some simple things you should remember to make the most of your special day, AND to save you money.

Choose your flowers wisely, I.e., make sure you are purchasing “in-season” flowers. Your florist can advise you on this.  Out of season flowers will cost you, sometimes, more than double.  Love the flowers below.

And don’t forget the natural beauty of your outdoor wedding venue.

If your wedding ceremony or reception will be outside, watch the weather carefully.  When I think of Fall, I think cooler weather.  But that might not be the case.  You might experience Indian Summer, and have a heat wave.  Either way, think of your guests.  Cool weather, make sure hot drinks are provided.  If you DO have that heatwave, make sure  you have cool beverages to keep your guests hydrated.

Ha ha!  The guests from the wedding in the photo above made good use of the water provided by their hosts.  This cute tub was a brilliant vessel.

It’s a good idea to keep a list of your guests’ emails, and send out a weather update, especially for those coming from out of town.  They will then be able to dress appropriately.  And help them out.  If the weather will be chilly, consider blankets for your guests’ use.  And don’t forget the bride and her attendants.  The gentlemen usually have jackets to keep them warm, but not the ladies.  Perhaps a lovey cashmere shall would be a considerate bridesmaid gift.  For hot weather, how about a personal fan?  🙂

Don’t neglect to factor in time the of day.  Maybe your wedding will be after we return to standard time vs. daylight savings.  You may wish to have a lovely sunset wedding photo.  If this is the case, plan the time of your wedding ceremony accordingly.

Bridesmaid Duties

Bridesmaid duties … real or ceremonial? Have you heard about the Bride who “fired” one of her bridesmaids via email?  The rejected bridesmaid then shared the email on twitter.  I just glanced at a few tweets, and the bride was crucified by other tweeters!  What do you think about it?

I probably am one of the few who was on the side of the bride.  While I would encourage any daughter of mine, or client NOT to “fire” an attendant, fact is, the “Twitter Bridesmaid” wasn’t doing her job. Based on the email to the bridesmaid, which she shared on twitter, (how’s that for a friend? Even though she blacked out the bride’s last name, everyone in their social circle knew who she was), the “fired” bridesmaid did absolutely nothing for the bride in her role as honor attendant.  When asked to be an attendant, the young lady should have thanked the bride prettily, and declined the honor.  If you don’t have the time or the money to be a bridesmaid, gracefully decline.  Because being a wedding attendant is expensive and time consuming.  You are expected to buy your own dress, shoes, gifts, (shower, bachelorette, and wedding), and travel.  (The bride should spring for your housing the night before the wedding and the night of the wedding however).  You should do your best to attend ALL pre-wedding events – but the rehearsal, rehearsal dinner, wedding… UNTIL THE END, are non-negotiable.  If you can’t be at those events, you shouldn’t be a bridesmaid. Period.

According to the brief email, the “fired” bridesmaid shared on twitter, it appeared that she attended no pre-wedding events, (I took it to include the rehearsal and rehearsal dinner, but could be wrong), and wanted to fly back before the reception was over.  Again, if the bride were my daughter or client, I’d encourage her to suck it up and deal with the lack-luster bridesmaid; but the twitter bride was well within her scope of expectations to “fire” her friend.  As for the email, she probably thought things would be less heated via the written word, and she offered to speak if the bridesmaid desired.

Perhaps “Bridesmaidzillas” are why some brides are opting to have only family members as honor attendants, (as one of my daughters did),  or have no bridesmaids at all. Perhaps that’s why the English use children?  …less temperamental than grown women.  I think Brides today are trying to make it easier on their attendants.  Note the photo above.  The bride from this wedding I did allowed her attendants to wear dresses they felt good in.  The colors were not even expected to be in the same color palate.

Moral…Brides be sensitive to the costs, both monetary and time, to your attendants; and bridesmaids, say “No, but thank you,” if you can’t do the job.